Anyone who has a baby in the Treasure Valley this year probably isn't naming her Karen.  In fact, this may be the end of the name altogether.  But Karens, this may be a good thing!

I have an aunt Karen, and she's just as sweet as she can be, and as far from the new Karen stereotype as a girl can get.  Not every Karen is a mess.

Wikipedia defines the slang Karen as "a woman perceived as entitled or demanding beyond the scope of what is appropriate or necessary. A common stereotype is that of a white woman who uses her privilege to demand her own way at the expense of others."

And now we have the Karen Halloween mask and a lot of nice Karens wondering how to get back into pop culture's good graces.

The Social Security Administration says the name Karen is plunging in popularity these days, but given all of this, it's no big surprise.  According to the SSA data on the name’s popularity through the last 113 years, had its lowest rank since 1930 last year.  2020 will probably be even worse.

But.  There's always a but.  You and my aunt Karen have the name all to yourselves right now.  There's no danger of teachers being overwhelmed by Karens and having to call them "Karen A." or "Karen P." and, you can stock up on the leftover key chains, coffee mugs, and bookmarks from the monogrammed racks at gas stations.  In fact, I might start drinking out of a Karen mug just to support you.  Oh, and how cool would it be if actual Karens are the ones wearing the Karen masks this Halloween?  You'll show them.  Love ya, Karens.

The name Karen peaked in 1965.  And just like Hannah, Ada, and Elsie, maybe it will make a comeback someday.